New way identified to prevent breast cancer cells from evading therapy

Inhibiting the process that causes resistance in these cells improves the efficacy of immunotherapy, could mean better outcomes

New way identified to prevent breast cancer cells from evading therapyNew research at the University of Alberta has revealed a way to increase the sensitivity to immunotherapy of a rare type of cells within a tumour that are responsible for treatment resistance and breast cancer progression. The study, recently published in the journal Cancer Letters, could pave the way to better treatment outcomes for patients. The researchers…

New way identified to track severity and progression of ALS

Researchers hope to move toward earlier diagnosis and effective treatments

New way identified to track severity and progression of ALSUniversity of Alberta researchers have discovered a new method to identify the severity of Lou Gehrig’s disease in patients and track its progression. The U of A team, led by Sanjay Kalra, a professor in the Division of Neurology, has made progress toward an imaging biomarker for white-matter degeneration in the brains of ALS patients. They hope…

Discovery could lead to more precise way to treat Parkinson’s disease

Potential biomarker could help with optimal electrode placement in deep brain stimulation surgery

Discovery could lead to more precise way to treat Parkinson’s diseaseUniversity of Alberta researchers have discovered a potential biomarker – the response of a particular reflex in the body dubbed the Hoffmann reflex – that would help surgeons deliver deep brain stimulation (DBS) more precisely and effectively to patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease. The work, led by U of A neurosurgeon Tejas Sankar, was recently published in the…

Website provides resources, support for LGBTQ2+ cancer patients

U of A faculty educator and two collaborators saw a need and worked to create a supportive space

Website provides resources, support for LGBTQ2+ cancer patientsCancer doesn’t discriminate, but the health-care system sometimes does. There’s a marked gap in information when it comes to resources and peer-support services tailored to LGBTQ2+ people. That need in the system is what prompted a University of Alberta faculty educator and collaborators to launch a new website, called Queering Cancer, aimed at closing the…

Low muscle mass predicts poor outcomes in colon cancer surgery

New U of A study suggests interventions to help patients build muscle before surgery may improve their outcomes

Low muscle quality and quantity are predictive of poor outcomes in colon resection surgery, according to a new study published in JAMA Surgery. Carla Prado, a researcher in the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Agricultural, Life & Environmental Sciences, and her team followed 1,630 patients who received a diagnosis of Stage I to Stage III colon cancer. The…

Why tumour cells become resistant to chemotherapy

U of A team discovers new mechanism that could lead to better treatments for breast cancer patients

Why tumour cells become resistant to chemotherapyA team of University of Alberta researchers has identified a new mechanism through which tumour cells become resistant to chemotherapy – a discovery that could lead to better treatments for women with breast cancer. Michael Jewer, a post-doctoral researcher in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, said that more than 20 per cent of breast cancer…

Protein causes mutations that lead to breast cancer cell aggression

U of A researcher uncovers new mechanism for why a particular biomarker is linked with poor outcomes in certain patients

Protein causes mutations that lead to breast cancer cell aggressionLike most scientists, University of Alberta biochemist Ing Swie Goping is curious. When her team discovered that a protein was associated with poor outcomes in breast cancer patients, she wanted to know why. Now, that curiosity has led to the discovery of a new mechanism for how certain breast cancers develop, which could one day…

Nicotine withdrawal in zebrafish offers clues to human addiction

Study on how fish respond to nicotine exposure suggests researchers could find ways to more effectively treat withdrawal in people with addictions

Nicotine withdrawal in zebrafish offers clues to human addictionResearchers have identified nicotine-induced withdrawal for the first time in the zebrafish model – a discovery that could be used to test ways of treating withdrawal from addiction in humans. Trevor Hamilton, an adjunct professor in the Faculty of Science and member of the Neuroscience and Mental Health Institute at the University of Alberta, examined the role of…

Video series aims to improve cancer screening in North

U of A researchers work with community members to produce culturally appropriate information

Video series aims to improve cancer screening in NorthA series of new videos co-created by University of Alberta researchers and communities in the Northwest Territories are striving to improve the use of cancer screening in the region. The series of 11 videos includes two that offer general information about cancer risks and prevention from a recognized physician in the community. The remaining nine are split…

Simple blood test to predict severity of COVID-19

U of A spinoff company Nanostics using diagnostic technology to help health professionals intervene more quickly

Simple blood test to predict severity of COVID-19A University of Alberta spinoff company focused on creating and commercializing non-invasive diagnostic tests is developing a simple blood test to predict the severity of COVID-19 in positive patients. Nanostics’ test assesses an individual’s viral load, which is the number of viruses they have replicating within their systems, and determines the immune response to COVID-19.…
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